Feb 032014
 

Hello lovelies! I don’t know if I’ve shared this before but a few months back me and my mum crew started craft night for a bit of social crafting.

We get together every month(ish) and I bring along the materials for everyone to make something to take home.

First we started with the no sew mason jar pincushion and a felt needle book (I forgot to take photos!).

Next we moved on to tissue paper pom poms and gingerbread men (again not photos!).

And this time we made valentine inspired embroidery hoops.

There’s usually cake, tea and wine involved and sometimes a lot of buttons!

It’s a chance for a gossip and a good old catch up with no one shouting ‘MUUUUUUUMMMMMYYYYYY’.

At the end of the evening we’ve all hopefully learnt something, shared something and have something lovely and handmade to take home with us. (Mine’s the unfinished hoop at the bottom!). I’m so proud of my Mum’s. Some of them before we started this would staple trousers back together (She’ll remain nameless!) and couldn’t sew on a button. But just look at all these fantastic hoops! :D

 

Hello my lovelies, are you starting to feel festive yet? I certainly am with all the Christmas fair prep I’ve been doing lately.  To help spread a little festive cheer here is a simple sewing tutorial – a merry little Christmas hoop. Perfect for beginners!

You will need:

An embroidery hoop (I used a 4 inch hoop), navy polka dot fabric, white felt, green felt (I used glittery felt), a scrap of brown felt, matching thread, star buttons, seed beads or sequins, ribbon for hanging, a circle of card and a basic sewing kit.

Before you make a start on your festive hoop, draw around the inside of your hoop onto a piece of thick card (i used a cat food box!) and cut out the circle. This will be used to finish off your hoop and hide all your stitching on the back at the end!

On with the hoop! Cut your pieces: one wiggly snow piece, 4 tree trunks and 4 tree triangles. Use your hoop as a size guide for cutting your shapes. If you are using a bigger hoop, cut bigger shapes!  My trees ranged from 3cm to 4cm tall.

Pin your felt snow in place and separate the two pieces of your hoop. Place your fabric over the top of the inner part of your hoop. Line up the outer hoop so that the screw is at the top and press down over the inner hoop. Gently pull the fabric around all of the edges to make sure it is tight across the hoop before tightening the screw to hold it all in place.

Sew the snow in place using a running stitch.

 

Arrange your tree trunks on the snow and stitch in place using whip stitch.

 

Sew the trees in place starting with the back ones. I used running stitch again for these.

Next its time to fancy up your trees! You can use whatever you like to make your trees bright and christmassy – sequins, felt scraps, metallic thread?

I used a star button and seed beads to Christmas up just one of my little trees. Once you are happy with the decorations it time to finish off your hoop.

Finishing off: First you will need to trim off some of the excess fabric. You will need to leave enough to tuck in to the back, about 2cm. Apply a thin layer of fabric glue around the edge of your hoop and allow to dry for 10 minutes (I used hi-tack fabric glue). After 10 minutes to glue should be tacky and you can neatly fold the fabric over the edge, towards the center of the hoop. You may need to apply a little more glue to hold the felt in place.

Next take your circle of card and place it on the wrong side (reverse) of a little square of fabric. apply a little glue to the card and allow to go tacky. Fold in the fabric and try to make sure it is stuck down all the way around. Allow the hoop and the card circle to dry completely before squishing the card circle into the back of the hoop to hide all of your stitching!

Add a piece of ribbon, hang up and admire!

This tutorial is for personal use only. You can make as many as you like for yourself or as gifts. If using my photographs, please gain permission before hand and link back to this original post. All designs and photographs are (c) Claire Payne.

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